Good Burritos for a Toxic World - Word&Way

Good Burritos for a Toxic World

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An annual tradition of this column calls attention to the kind of religious inspiration that religion didn’t necessarily request. Suspecting that the cause of these decisions were due to indigestion rather than inspiration, I’ve named them the Bad Burrito Awards.

Ken SatterfieldKen SatterfieldFor example, there’s Mike Demastus, pastor of the Fort Des Moines Church of Christ in Iowa, who installed a bulletproof pulpit in his church with the optional magnetic gun mount — because WWJD (Where Would Jesus Duck)? (tinyurl.com/Burrito2018-1).

There’s the billboard in St. Charles, Mo., with a picture of the president, accompanied by the verse “The word became flesh” and MAGA variation “Make the Gospel Great Again.” Should we equate any politician with Jesus like that (tinyurl.com/Burrito2018-2)?

Or Bay View, Mich., a “heavens gated” community where until this summer only practicing Christians were allowed to own property (tinyurl.com/Burrito2018-4). And the Arizona mom who tried to wake her son up for Easter services – with a stun gun (tinyurl.com/Burrito2018-5).

And just then, I was stopped in my tracks when Oxford Dictionaries announced their 2018 Word of the Year: toxic (tinyurl.com/Burrito2018-WOY).

There really has been plenty of positive news – really! So, in a break with tradition, let’s award some Good Burrito Awards for those stories that touched my heart:

A “Breakfast for Dads” event at Dallas, Texas, middle school that sought 50 men to stand in for absent fathers, and nearly 600 showed up. (tinyurl.com/Burrito2018-6)

Mykehia Curry, a Georgia student who literally sent up prayers to afford supplies, by balloons, and the pastor 15 miles away that answered the request (https://tinyurl.com/Burrito2018-7)

Michael Curry, the Episcopal bishop preaching on redemptive love during the royal wedding, moving millions of viewers (tinyurl.com/Burrito2018-8).

A posthumous award to Fred “Mister” Rogers, the Presbyterian minister whose 2018 documentary reminded people of the power of treating each other as neighbors (tinyurl.com/Burrito2018-9)

The Lutheran church in Bemidji, Minn., that cared enough about their Indian reservation neighbors to create a one-of-a-kind organ stop (tinyurl.com/Burrito2018-10).

And finally, there’s Walter Carr, who walked 20 miles overnight to his first day of work in Alabama when his car broke down and was given the company owner’s personal car. (tinyurl.com/Burrito2018-11)

It’s just a reminder – a toxic world is no match for the power of a Good Burrito.

Ken Satterfield is a former media specialist and current marketing director for Word&Way. He welcomes your product suggestions. By the way, inclusion in this article does not constitute an endorsement. 

Other Bad Burrito columns:

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