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In Georgia, Florida, Michigan, Missouri, Ohio, and elsewhere, many faith leaders perceive a threat to voting rights that warrants their intervention in a volatile political issue. Here is what some of the faith leaders are saying.

A General Baptist minister in Missouri who went on leave after a February sermon widely criticized for sexist comments about the weight of married women issued a new statement along with his church as he prepares to return to the pulpit.

James Ackerman of Prison Fellowship urges Christians to use words that uphold people’s potential, rather than those that hold them back with harmful stereotypes. Words should affirm their whole identity, he adds, including their capacity to change and grow.

Editor Brian Kaylor reflects on getting his second COVID-19 vaccine and recent polling showing that White evangelicals are the least

Church

A General Baptist minister in Missouri who went on leave after a February sermon widely criticized for sexist comments about the weight of married women issued a new statement along with his church as he prepares to return to the pulpit.

Liberty University, one of the nation’s largest Christian universities, is suing former president Jerry Falwell Jr. for $10 million, citing a breach of contract and a conspiracy to mislead the university’s board. 

William Jewell College, a historic Baptist school in Liberty, Missouri, announced the creation of a “Racial Reconciliation Commission” Monday to document the school’s ties to slavery and explore future steps in response.

Nation

In Georgia, Florida, Michigan, Missouri, Ohio, and elsewhere, many faith leaders perceive a threat to voting rights that warrants their intervention in a volatile political issue. Here is what some of the faith leaders are saying.

After over three years living in a Salt Lake City church to avoid being deported, Honduran immigrant Vicky Chavez stepped outside Thursday with tears in her eyes as church congregants and friends cheered, celebrating her newfound freedom.

An Iowa man who refused to wear a COVID-19 face mask at work because it violated his religious beliefs is not entitled to unemployment benefits, a state judge has ruled.

World

The eruption of the La Soufrière volcano on Friday left the population on the main island of St. Vincent and the Grenadines without clean water. Local churches and international relief groups quickly started mobilizing aid.

Amid widespread disgust with traditional politicians and an extremely fragmented electorate, Frepap, the political arm of a messianic religious group called the Israelites of the New Universal Pact, has emerged as a potential favorite in legislative elections Sunday.

Across the country and the globe, World Vision is continuing a multi-pronged effort to meet the needs of people facing the health crisis and the secondary effects of the COVID-19 pandemic. Globally, the crisis that began more than a year ago has claimed 2.89 million lives.

Books

Women’s History Month may have ended weeks ago, but women’s impact on religion and spirituality goes on year-round. Here are 10 new nonfiction books, both forthcoming and released in the last year, that explore women's roles and influence in Christian traditions — plus, one bonus work of fiction.

So-called “premium” Bibles aren’t new. And while they may not carry a steep price tag, a number of new and traditional Bible publishers are stressing the beauty of an old-fashioned book and the experience of slowing down to read at a time when so much of life is lived online.

Sarah Bessey and other contributors to A Rhythm of Prayer responded to the backlash with a statement Thursday evening, saying critics are missing the point of a controversial prayer by Chanequa Walker-Barnes.

Scriptures in Pictures

Nehemiah 2:11-18 as seen in photos of French President Emmanuel Macron visiting the damage and reconstruction efforts at Notre Dame Cathedral in Paris two years after a devastating fire.

Jeremiah 38, as seen in photos of Georgia State Rep. Park Cannon being placed in handcuffs by Georgia State Troopers after being asked to stop knocking on a door that leads to Gov. Brian Kemp’s office while Kemp was signing a voter suppression bill in the Georgia State Capitol Building

The rebuilding of the Temple in Ezra 3, as seen in photos of Pope Francis leading worship at the site of churches destroyed by the Islamic State at Hosh al-Bieaa Church Square, in Mosul, Iraq.

Editorials

Editor-in-Chief Brian Kaylor reacts to recent U.S. Supreme Court rulings on coronavirus restrictions and worship. He argues a majority of the justices wrongly compare worship gatherings to commercial activities.

Editor Brian Kaylor reflects on getting his second COVID-19 vaccine and recent polling showing that White evangelicals are the least likely demographic to get vaccinated. Thank God, love neighbors, and get vaccinated!

Editor Brian Kaylor tells the Good Friday story as if set this year in Richmond, Virginia. As the Bible tells the story, Barabbas and the two men crucified along with Jesus are insurrectionists (not thieves).

W&W Voices

Columnist Ken Satterfield considers the potential of email signatures, the P.S. of electronic mail as the last impression your message will leave. This can provide ways to use the emails you send to encourage, amuse, uplift, and inspire your recipients.

Columnist Greg Mamula reflects on the crowd waving at Jesus during Holy Week and asks what kind of king did they think they were waving at. And he wonders how we might answer that same question today.

Patrick Wilson reflects on visiting the campus of his alma mater, Baylor University, hours after the school’s Commission on Historic Campus Representations publicly released its report documenting Baylor’s ties to slavery and the Confederacy.

Other Opinions

James Ackerman of Prison Fellowship urges Christians to use words that uphold people’s potential, rather than those that hold them back with harmful stereotypes. Words should affirm their whole identity, he adds, including their capacity to change and grow.

Steven K. Green writes that in prioritizing religious liberty claims over health and anti-bias concerns, the Supreme Court’s conservative majority has promoted a skewed conception of what religious freedom is. 

The mark of the beast in Revelation has throughout history been misunderstood as referring to various events and phenomena. Its connection to the COVID-19 vaccine is but the latest example of such misunderstanding.

EDITOR’S PICKS