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This week we returned to the classroom to teach a weeklong intensive course together at Wheaton College, making it one of the first on-campus college classes to be taught in the U.S. during this new school year. So, of course, there was a  tornado.

What if instead of rewarding the most brash, most aggressive, most self-assured leaders we instead elevated those who didn’t seek the position? What if we took into account which candidates have more humility, self-sacrifice, and even hesitancy when offered power and glory?

We humans can’t live by bad news alone. We need breaks during which we can focus on truth, beauty, and goodness — or on the sublime music of J.S. Bach, sometimes called the fifth evangelist.

Alan Cross, a Southern Baptist pastor in California, reflects on how his church has worked to both meet in person for worship and follow state health restrictions amid the coronavirus pandemic.

As a White House staffer, Melissa Rogers had the opportunity to see Vice President Biden up close. That’s why she writes that Trump’s assertions about Biden’s faith could not be more wrong.

James K.A. Smith argues that White evangelicals’ view of racism is hampered by an aspect of evangelical spirituality he calls evangelicalism’s rationalism. He adds that this focus prevents White evangelicals from fully addressing the sin of racism.

Editor Brian Kaylor reflects on the sudden ending of the Gospel of Mark and what it means to have faith during a time of uncertainty like the coronavirus pandemic.

Columnist Greg Mamula reflects on the power of stories and how we need stories that come from outside our immediate context to remind us of different experiences.

Columnist Ken Satterfield unpacks how to use the HEIC photo format as church communicators may find themselves with new phones offering better ways of capturing and sharing ministry moments.

Christian author and activist Shane Claiborne critiques the resumption of federal executions in July as three people were killed after 17 years without a single federal execution.